Advice for the next generation

Phew! I’ve just got back from a whistle-stop visit to the other end of the country for my gorgeous little niece’s Christening. The travelling was exhausting, but it was fantastic to have a big family get-together.

While we all tucked into lunch, my sister put up a wooden ‘wishing tree’ and invited the guests to write a wish or piece of advice for the new baby to read when she was older.

Ever the money nerd (and literature nerd), I put down a quote from Charles Dickens’ David Copperfield:

“Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.”

If only I’d stuck by Mr Micawber’s recipe for happiness myself…

I’m slightly terrified by the realisation that back in 2015 I pledged I would be debt-free by June 2017 … and it’s June in a few days.

I currently have £850 outstanding. That’s going to be a big ask.

But in a way, I’m glad this is proving tough, if for no other reason than it SERVES ME RIGHT. I failed to do a really simple thing for years – live within my means – and yup, I’m reaping the misery Dickens was warning people about back in Eighteen…whenever. (Okay, so I’m not that much of a Dickens geek).

What advice would you give the next generation, given the mistakes you’ve made in the past? Let me know in the comments.

 


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5 thoughts on “Advice for the next generation

  1. Susan says:

    Don’t fritter away student loan money! Use it for the essentials and give the rest back!!! Better yet, don’t take any loans out. This is a US perspective. I know other countries have free/low cost higher education.

  2. Linda Sand says:

    Take long walks every day all of your life. Walking has amazing health benefits you probably won’t appreciate until you get old.

  3. Chistine says:

    I think mine is the same concept but applied to more things than finance. Take care of yourself early. Don’t let things become problems and then fix them later. Take a proactive, preventative approach.

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